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Schedule

 
 

Randall Brown: Flash Fiction 

We will explore various ways writers attack the demands of the limited word-count of flash fiction, using both more traditional narrative techniques and more experimental non-narrative methods. In addition to craft, we will look at ideas regarding story, narratively, and genre. Also, throughout, we’ll remain cognizant of the fact that we aren’t writing flash in a vacuum but within a literary community where many other flash fiction pieces have been and will be in circulation. There’s also the opportunity to complete various flash projects for critical feedback at any time post-workshop.

  • REQUIRED MATERIALS: Pocket Guide to Flash Fiction, 0983792852, Matter Press; 1st edition (2012)
  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUBMISSIONS: 1,000 words

brownBIO: Randall Brown teaches at Rosemont College's MFA in Creative Writing Program. He appears in The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Fiction: Tips from Editors, Teachers, and Writers in the Field and in The Norton Anthology of Hint Fiction. He's also the founder of Matter Press, its online magazine The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts, and the blog FlashFiction.Net. He has been published and anthologized widely, both in-print and online.

 

Erin Kelly: The Fundamentals of Children's Literature

To reach young readers, you must balance a youthful imagination with skill, craft, and adult sensibility. This course will cover the various types of children's books, their requirements, what editors and agents expect from authors, and how to find your place in the market.

kellyBIO: Erin Entrada Kelly has more than 20 years of experience as a journalist, magazine editor, book publicist, and copy editor. Her third novel, HELLO, UNIVERSE, will be released by HarperCollins in March. She's received more than a dozen journalism awards from the Louisiana Press Association, the Associated Press, and the Council for the Advancement of Secondary Education. She's also a regular contributor to Political Research Associates and the Library Journal, where she specializes in historical non-fiction, social sciences, and Gothic fiction. She has a bachelor's degree in liberal arts and women's studies from McNeese State University and an MFA from Rosemont.

Tawni Waters: Travel Writing That Takes You Places

“One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.” Henry Miller

The most beautiful thing about travel is that it takes you places, not only physically, but mentally, spiritually, and emotionally as well. The best travel writers take readers on a journey with them. Readers emerge from the reading experience a little different than they were when they went in. This workshop will teach you how to craft a literary travel piece that takes your readers (and editors) to places they’ve never been. Submissions Due: June 1 to cspataro@rosemont.edu

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT/POEM LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 20 pages of prose or 5 poems  

watersBIO: Tawni Waters’ debut novel, Beauty of the Broken, was released by Simon and Schuster in 2014. In addition to winning the prestigious International Literacy Association’s Award for Young Adult Literature, it won the Housatonic Book Award, was named an exceptional book of 2015 by the Children’s Book Council, was shortlisted for the Reading the West Book Award, and was included on the Kansas State Reading Circle List. It was adapted for the stage and performed by Sacramento’s Now Here This and is being adapted for the screen by Jeff Arch, the screenwriter best known for writing Sleepless in Seattle. Her second novel, The Long Ride Home, was released by Sourcebooks Fire in September 2017 to glowing reviews. She is the author of two poetry collections: Siren Song (Burlesque Press) and So Speak the Stars (forthcoming). Her work was anthologized in Best Travel Writing 2010, The Soul of a Great Traveler, and Monday Nights, and has been published in myriad journals and magazines. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of New Orleans and teaches creative writing at various universities and writers retreats throughout the U.S., Europe, and Mexico. In her spare time, she talks to angels, humanely evicts spiders from her floorboards, and plays Magdalene to a minor rock god.

J.C. Todd: The Generator: Writing and Caring for Early Drafts --THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL!

They’re called “early attempts,” “pre-writes,” “shitty drafts,” and worse. But truly they are the first appearance of your words, your sensibility, your personal images and questions and quests. They are not replicable or replaceable.  Why are we so hard on them? Why do we stifle what is new?  The weekend includes prompts, writing, and workshops. Mischievous and challenging prompts will provoke us to write unexpected drafts filled with fresh air. Workshops will focus on strategies for taking care of new drafts and cultivating them. We’ll learn to identify imaginative seeds and ask what they need to grow. We’ll see how some “mistakes” are instead breaks with conventional language and thought, gaps where your singular imagination flies wildly toward new perception, new worlds. Craft workshops are for finishing; this workshop is for beginning with a leap.

 

toddBIO: J. C. Todd’s books are FUBAR, an artist book collaboration (Lucia Press), What Space This Body (Wind Publications), and two chapbooks. Poems have appeared in the American Poetry Review, Paris Review, Prairie Schooner, Virginia Quarterly Review and most recently in the Beloit Poetry Journal, Canary, Ekphrastic Review, and Valparaiso Review. A Pew Fellow in the Arts and winner of the Rita Dove Poetry Prize, she has received fellowships and awards from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the New Jersey Arts Council, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the Ucross, Ragdale and Leeway foundations. She has taught creative writing at Bryn Mawr College and the MFA program at Rosemont College, and in 2016 was a writer-in-residence at Humboldt University in Berlin. JC is thrilled to return to the Rosemont Retreat! (photo: Mark Hillringhouse)

Sarah Yake: Agent in Residence

Find out what an agent actually does: what a typical day might look like, what an agent does for their clients, and how to use your manuscript or any book to write a synopsis and a query letter. Individual pitch sessions will be available for all weekend retreat attendees.

yake

BIO: Sarah Yake has been an agent with the Frances Collin Literary Agency since 2005. She manages the foreign and subsidiary rights sales for all of the agency’s clients, including the estates of Rachel Carson, John Williams and Esther Forbes. Her own clients include Sarah Blake, Nadine Darling, Kirsten Kaschock, Christopher Merkner, Matthew Jakubowski and Wendy Sparrow.

Prior to becoming an agent Sarah managed a bookstore (remember Encore Books?) and was a sales rep for Random House. She holds an MA in English Literature from West Chester University and has a few obscure poetry publishing credits to her name.

She can be found on Twitter @slyyake

Publishers Marketplace http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/members/slyyake/ and Manuscript Wish List http://www.manuscriptwishlist.com/mswl-post/sarah-yake/

Jennifer Steil: Novelists Training Camp

This class aims to propel your novel forward, helping you generate new material and artfully edit your drafts. We’ll be using in-class writing exercises to discover riveting first lines, develop characters, build suspense, and make setting and objects do emotional work. We’ll talk about four-letter words such as “plot” and dive boldly into theme. I will also share useful techniques for self-editing, which is where much of the real art of novel writing happens.

I will be giving your novel excerpts a close read and we’ll be discussing them in workshop. By the end of this class, you will have generated many pages of new material and have a sharper idea of where your work is headed.

Submissions Due: June 1 to cspataro@rosemont.edu 

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 5,000

steilBIO: Jennifer Steil is an award-winning author and journalist. Her novel, The Ambassador’s Wife, won the 2013 William Faulkner-William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition Best Novel award and the 2016 Phillip McMath Post Publication book award. It was shortlisted for both the Bisexual Book Award and the Lascaux Novel Award. Jennifer’s first book, The Woman Who Fell From the Sky, a memoir about her tenure as editor of the Yemen Observer newspaper in Sana’a, was praised by The New York TimesNewsweek, and the Sydney Morning Herald. The Minneapolis Star-Tribune chose it as one of their best travel books of the year in 2010, and Elle magazine awarded it their Readers’ Prize. Her freelance work has appeared in a variety of outlets including the Saranac ReviewWorld Policy Journal, The Week, Vogue UK, Die Welt, and Time. Jennifer earned a BA in Theatre from Oberlin College, a MFA in Creative Writing from Sarah Lawrence, and a MS in Journalism from Columbia University.

Elise Juska: Short Story Workshop

This crux of this workshop is thoughtful and detailed discussion of participants' short fiction. Diverse readings and daily writing exercises complement generous amounts of peer feedback.  Instructor will provide written critiques.

Submissions Due: June 1 to cspataro@rosemont.edu 

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT/PAGE LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 20 pages (standard formatting: double-spaced, 12 pt. type, 1" margins)

juskaBIO: Elise Juska's novel-in-stories, The Blessings, was selected for Barnes & Noble's Discover Great New Writers series, Entertainment Weekly's "Must List," and the Philadelphia Inquirer's Best Books of 2014; her new novel, If We Had Known, is forthcoming in April 2018. Juska's short fiction has appeared in Ploughshares, The Gettysburg Review, The Missouri Review, The Hudson Review, The Colorado Review, Prairie Schooner and numerous other publications. She is the recipient of the Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction from Ploughshares and her short fiction has been cited by The Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies. She teaches fiction writing at the University of the Arts, where she received the 2014 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching.

Jillian Sullivan: Creative Non-fiction – Casting the Spell

To write creative non-fiction, work that employs language analytically, subversively, seductively as French writer Monique Wittig says, is to write knowing your own voice and where you stand. It’s telling the truth you want to tell - or understand - with clarity and compassion. It’s using story, with all its attributes of character, dialogue and detail, to illuminate and transform fact.

This week we’ll examine aspects of our lives mythically to see where we’ve come from and what we face as writers. We’ll bring the techniques of fiction to facts, and use sensory detail and the richness of the subconscious mind to evoke authentic worlds. Submissions Due: June 1 to cspataro@rosemont.edu 

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 1200 words, which may be part of a larger work

jillianBIO: Jillian Sullivan lives and writes in the Ida Valley, in the South Island of New Zealand. She’s published novels, collections of short stories, poetry, creative non-fiction and memoir. She has a Master of Creative Writing from Massey University, and teaches writing in NZ and in America each year. Her awards include The Highlights Fiction Award from America, and the Kathleen Grattan Prize and The Takahe Prize for poetry in New Zealand. Her latest book is the memoir A Way Home, (Potton and Burton 2016). This year she is the recipient of the Beatson Fellowship for a senior writer.

www.jilliansullivan.co.nz

 

 

 

Liz Abrams-Morley: Poetry of Place, Placement, and Displacement

Immigrant, migrant, insider, outsider—our identities as well as our poetic voices are infused with and informed by our place in the many varied places in which we find ourselves.   In this workshop we will examine the work of published poets from varied cultural backgrounds and, from prompts provided, create poems which reflect and draw on cultural and personal history and experience.  Participants will be given model poems and prompts in order to generate new work for the first part of the week.  We will share and respond, and spend time revising these drafts as the week progresses.  The instructor will introduce a variety of strategies for re-vision—literally re-seeing, reentering—maybe even encourage you to allow drafts to become messier and more complex on the way to you discovering the depth of the poem.  No work need be submitted in advance of the week; just bring your curiosity and adventurousness and leave your fear and perfectionism at home.

  • POEM LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: No advanced submissions

lizBIO: Liz Abrams-Morley’s newest book, Beholder, is due out from Word Poetry in April, 2018.  Inventory, was published by Finishing Line Press in 2014.  Her collection Necessary Turns was published by Word Poetry in 2010 and won an Eric Hoffer Award for Excellence in Small Press Publishing that year.  Liz’s poems and short stories have been published in a variety of nationally distributed anthologies, journals and ezines, and have been read on NPR.   Co-founder of Around the Block Writing Collaborative, (www.aroundtheblockwriters.org), she has taught in Rosemont’s MFA program and teaches literacy through the arts programs to children in K-12 classrooms. Wife, mother, grandmother, and perpetual activist, Liz wades knee deep in the flow of everyday life from which she draws inspiration and, occasionally, exasperation.  Visit her at www.lizabramsmorley.org.

Tawni Waters: Writer-in-Residence

Tawni will be available to provide in-depth one-on-one manuscript consultations in all genres (poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction) by appointment. Ten slots will be filled on a first come, first served basis. After registration, please contact the program director, Carla Spataro, at cspataro@rosemont.edu, to reserve your space.

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUBMISSIONS: Advanced submission is required. Please limit prose to 3,500 words and no more than five pages of poetry.
  • Submission Deadline: June 1, 2018

watersBio:  Tawni Waters’s debut novel, Beauty of the Broken, was released by Simon and Schuster in 2014. In addition to winning the prestigious International Literacy Association’s Award for Young Adult Literature, it won the Housatonic Book Award, was named an exceptional book of 2015 by the Children’s Book Council, was shortlisted for the Reading the West Book Award, and was included on the Kansas State Reading Circle List. It was adapted for the stage and performed by Sacramento’s Now Here This and is being adapted for the screen by Jeff Arch, the screenwriter best known for writing Sleepless in Seattle. Her second novel, The Long Ride Home, was released by Sourcebooks Fire in September 2017 to glowing reviews. She is the author of two poetry collections: Siren Song (Burlesque Press) and So Speak the Stars (forthcoming). Her work was anthologized in Best Travel Writing 2010, The Soul of a Great Traveler, and Monday Nights, and has been published in myriad journals and magazines. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of New Orleans and teaches creative writing at various universities and writers retreats throughout the U.S., Europe, and Mexico. In her spare time, she talks to angels, humanely evicts spiders from her floorboards, and plays Magdalene to a minor rock god.

WEEKEND SCHEDULE

Friday Check-In 12-4 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
Friday Supper and Welcome 5:00 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
First Workshop 7:00-9:00 pm Please Check Course Packet
Saturday
 Breakfast 7:00-9:30 am  Gracemere Hall Great Room 
 Morning Workshop 10:00am-12:30pm  Please Check Course Packet 
Lunch   1:00-2:30 pm

Cardinall Hall

 Workshops  3:00-6:00 pm Please Check Course Packet 
 Dinner   6:30-7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room    
Evening Reading (open mic) 7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
Sunday
Breakfast 7:00-9:00 am Gracemere Hall Great Room
Workshops 9:30-11:30 am Please Check Course Packet
Farewell Lunch 12:00 Gracemere Hall Great Room

WEEKLONG RETREAT

Check-in-Sunday

4:00-6:00 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room

Sunday Supper and Welcome 6:00 Gracemere Hall Great Room
First Workshop 8:00

TBA

The Daily Schedule

Breakfast  7:00-10:00 am  Gracemere Hall Great Room  
FREE TIME 10:00 -12:00 pm  
Writer’s and Readers Series 12:00-1:00 pm Kistler Library Info Commons
Lunch  1:00-2:00 pm Cardinal Hall Cafeteria
Workshops 2:00-5:00 TBA
Dinner   On your own

Special Events

Monday Night Faculty Reading 7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
Tuesday Night Informal Publishing Roundtable 7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room

Wednesday Night Guest and

Alumni Reading                    

7:30 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room  

Thursday Night Student Open Mic

7:30 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room

Friday Night Farewell Supper           

6:00 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room

Checkout-Saturday

 10:00 am  
 

  

 

 

 

Questions?

Contact MFA Program Director,
Carla Spataro
cspataro@rosemont.edu or 610-527-0200 ext. 2346