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Schedule

 
 

Randall Brown Flash Fiction 

We will explore various ways writers attack the demands of the limited word-count of flash fiction, using both more traditional narrative techniques and more experimental non-narrative methods. In addition to craft, we will look at ideas regarding story, narratively, and genre. Also, throughout, we’ll remain cognizant of the fact that we aren’t writing flash in a vacuum but within a literary community where many other flash fiction pieces have been and will be in circulation. There’s also the opportunity to complete various flash projects for critical feedback at any time post-workshop.

  • REQUIRED MATERIALS: Pocket Guide to Flash Fiction, 0983792852, Matter Press; 1st edition (2012)
  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUBMISSIONS: 1,000 words

brownRandall Brown teaches at Rosemont College's MFA in Creative Writing Program. He appears in The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Fiction: Tips from Editors, Teachers, and Writers in the Field and in The Norton Anthology of Hint Fiction. He's also the founder of Matter Press, its online magazine The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts, and the blog FlashFiction.Net. He has been published and anthologized widely, both in-print and online.

 

 

Erin Kelly The Fundamentals of Children's Literature

To reach young readers, you must balance a youthful imagination with skill, craft, and adult sensibility. This course will cover the various types of children's books, their requirements, what editors and agents expect from authors, and how to find your place in the market.

 

kellyErin Entrada Kelly is a professor of children’s literature in the graduate fiction and publishing programs at Rosemont College, where she earned her MFA. Erin is also a short story writer. Her short fiction has been nominated for the Philippines Free Press Literary Award for Short Fiction and the Pushcart Prize. Erin received the 2018 Newbery Medal for Hello, Universe, the 2017 APALA Award for The Land of Forgotten Girls, and the 2016 Golden Kite Honor Award for Blackbird Fly. She is a New York Times bestseller. Erin’s next release, LALANI OF THE DISTANT SEA, an epic fantasy inspired by Filipino folklore, will be released on May 7, 2019.

 

 

 

 

Tawni Waters Travel Writing That Takes You Places

“One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.” Henry Miller

The most beautiful thing about travel is that it takes you places, not only physically, but mentally, spiritually, and emotionally as well. The best travel writers take readers on a journey with them. Readers emerge from the reading experience a little different than they were when they went in. This workshop will teach you how to craft a literary travel piece that takes your readers (and editors) to places they’ve never been. Submissions Due: June 15 to cspataro@rosemont.edu

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT/POEM LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 20 pages of prose or 5 poems  
watersTawni Waters’ debut novel, Beauty of the Broken, was released by Simon and Schuster in 2014. In addition to winning the prestigious International Literacy Association’s Award for Young Adult Literature, it won the Housatonic Book Award, was named an exceptional book of 2015 by the Children’s Book Council, was shortlisted for the Reading the West Book Award, and was included on the Kansas State Reading Circle List. It was adapted for the stage and performed by Sacramento’s Now Here This and is being adapted for the screen by Jeff Arch, the screenwriter best known for writing Sleepless in Seattle. Her second novel, The Long Ride Home, was released by Sourcebooks Fire in September 2017. She is the author of two poetry collections: Siren Song (Burlesque Press) and So Speak the Stars (Texture Press). Her work was anthologized in Best Travel Writing 2010, The Soul of a Great Traveler, and Monday Nights, and has been published in myriad journals and magazines. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of New Orleans and teaches creative writing at various universities and writers retreats throughout the U.S., Europe, and Mexico.

Grant Clauser Voice in Poetry: What is it and how to use it?

Voice is that mystical thing that distinguishes your poems from everyone else's. It’s like your personal accent from a country only you inhabit. We all strive to write poetry with a strong voice, but few people can explain exactly what that means. In this class we'll explore the meaning of voice, talk about what elements make it up and how to harness it to create compelling poems. We'll use a variety of in-class exercises as well as writing prompts to let you explore your voice and understand how to push it into new territory.

 

clauser19Grant Clauser is the author of four books, most recently The Magician's Handbook and Reckless Constellations. His awards include the Cider Press Review Book Award, the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize and the Montgomery County Poet Laureate. His poems have appeared in The American Poetry ReviewCortland Review, The Journal, The Literary Review, Painted Bride Quarterly, Southern Poetry Review and others. He's a contributing editor to the online publication Cleaver and works as a senior editor for  Wirecutter at the New York Times.

Sarah Yake Agent in Residence

Find out what an agent actually does: what a typical day might look like, what an agent does for their clients, and how to use your manuscript or any book to write a synopsis and a query letter. Individual pitch sessions will be available for all weekend retreat attendees.

yake

Sarah Yake has been an agent with the Frances Collin Literary Agency since 2005. She manages the foreign and subsidiary rights sales for all of the agency’s clients, including the estates of Rachel Carson, John Williams and Esther Forbes. Her own clients include Sarah Blake, Nadine Darling, Kirsten Kaschock, Christopher Merkner, Matthew Jakubowski and Wendy Sparrow.

Prior to becoming an agent Sarah managed a bookstore (remember Encore Books?) and was a sales rep for Random House. She holds an MA in English Literature from West Chester University and has a few obscure poetry publishing credits to her name.

She can be found on Twitter @slyyake

Publishers Marketplace http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/members/slyyake/ and Manuscript Wish List http://www.manuscriptwishlist.com/mswl-post/sarah-yake/

Charles Holdefer The Balancing Act: Narration, Character, and Dialogue in Your Novel

Telling a story well requires a sure touch with narration, characterization and dialogue. But how do you find the right balance? This is a nuts-and-bolts craft workshop that welcomes fiction writers of all levels. We’ll look at brief samples from contemporary writers (Zadie Smith, William Trevor, et al.) and do several exercises that will allow participants to generate new writing or to experiment with their work-in-progress. Each writer will also be invited to workshop a piece of fiction with the group.

We’ll consider characterization techniques and questions like dialogue tags, dialect, idiolect, profanity (yes, swearing is an artful activity!) and slang. We’ll also explore when to give your characters a rest and let your narrator do the talking. The common saying, “Show don’t tell” isn’t always true, but this fact begs the questions: How do I show? When do I tell?

Writers will leave this workshop with a keener appreciation of the tools at their disposal and how they might serve their story.

Submissions Due: June 15 to cspataro@rosemont.edu 

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 5,000

holdefer2019Charles Holdefer is the author of four novels, including The Contractor, which was an American Booksellers Association “Book Sense Pick” and was translated into several languages. His fiction won a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in the New England Review, North American Review, Chicago Quarterly Review, Slice and elsewhere. His other books include George Saunders’ Pastoralia: Bookmarked (nonfiction), Dick Cheney in Shorts (stories) and the forthcoming Magic Even You Can Do (fiction hybrid). He also writes essays and reviews for various magazines and teaches at the University of Poitiers, France. Visit Charles at www.charlesholdefer.com.

Curtis Smith The Short Story, Piece by Piece

This class will be more than a workshop. We’ll talk craft and discuss some interesting stories. We’ll write—daily prompts that might very well give you the beginnings of your next story. We’ll bring in outside voices by using author videos from YouTube, and we’ll also listen to your voice as each participant delivers a short talk on an aspect of writing or craft.

Submissions Due: June 15 to cspataro@rosemont.edu 

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT/PAGE LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 4,000 words (15 pages/standard formatting--double-spaced with 1" margins)

smithCurtis Smith has published over 100 stories and essays. His work has been cited by or included in The Best American Short Stories, The Best American Mystery Stories, The Best American Spiritual Writing, The Best Short Fictions, and the WW Norton anthology New Micros. He was worked with independent publishers to put out five story collections, four novels, two essay collections, and one work of creative nonfiction.

 

Jillian Sullivan Creative Non-fiction – Casting the Spell

To write creative non-fiction, work that employs language analytically, subversively, seductively as French writer Monique Wittig says, is to write knowing your own voice and where you stand. It’s telling the truth you want to tell - or understand - with clarity and compassion. It’s using story, with all its attributes of character, dialogue and detail, to illuminate and transform fact.

This week we’ll examine aspects of our lives mythically to see where we’ve come from and what we face as writers. We’ll bring the techniques of fiction to facts, and use sensory detail and the richness of the subconscious mind to evoke authentic worlds. Submissions Due: June 15 to cspataro@rosemont.edu 

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: 1200 words, which may be part of a larger work

jillianJillian Sullivan lives and writes in the Ida Valley, in the South Island of New Zealand. She’s published novels, collections of short stories, poetry, creative non-fiction and memoir. She has a Master of Creative Writing from Massey University, and teaches writing in NZ and in America each year. Her awards include The Highlights Fiction Award from America, and the Kathleen Grattan Prize and The Takahe Prize for poetry in New Zealand. Her latest book is the memoir A Way Home, (Potton and Burton 2016). This year she is the recipient of the Beatson Fellowship for a senior writer.

www.jilliansullivan.co.nz

 

 

Artress Bethany White Poetry-Digging In: Examining the Intersections of History, Witness, and Form

In this workshop, we will examine recent poetry collections by Terrance Hayes and Molly McCully Brown and determine where and when their work operates at the intersection of history, a poetics of witness, and form. We will then use this lens to interrogate our own poems-in-progress. I will offer tips on archival research, project development, and approaches to writing in form. I would like students to walk away from this workshop with a suite of polished poems ready for journal submission.  Submissions Due: June 15 to cspataro@rosemont.edu 

  • POEM LIMIT FOR SUMBISSIONS: Maximum 10 pages of poetry

 

white

Artress Bethany White is a poet, essayist, and literary critic. She is the recipient of the 2018 Trio Award for her forthcoming poetry collection, My Afmerica (Trio House Press, March 2019). Her prose and poetry have appeared in such journals as Harvard Review, Tupelo Quarterly, The Hopkins Review, Pleiades, Solstice, Poet Lore, Ecotone, and The Account. Her collection of essays, Survivor’s Guilt: Essays on Race and American Identity is forthcoming from New Rivers Press/Minnesota State University in March 2020. White has received the Mary Hambidge Distinguished Fellowship from the Hambidge Center for Creative Arts for her nonfiction, The Mona Van Duyn Scholarship in Poetry from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and writing residencies at The Writer’s Hotel and the Tupelo Press/MASS MoCA studios. She is visiting professor of American cultural studies at Albright College in Pennsylvania.

Tawni Waters: Writer-in-Residence

Tawni will be available to provide in-depth one-on-one manuscript consultations in all genres (poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction) by appointment. Ten slots will be filled on a first come, first served basis. After registration, please contact the program director, Carla Spataro, at cspataro@rosemont.edu, to reserve your space.

  • WORD COUNT LIMIT FOR SUBMISSIONS: Advanced submission is required. Please limit prose to 3,500 words and no more than five pages of poetry.
  • Submission Deadline: June 15, 2019

watersTawni Waters’ debut novel, Beauty of the Broken, was released by Simon and Schuster in 2014. In addition to winning the prestigious International Literacy Association’s Award for Young Adult Literature, it won the Housatonic Book Award, was named an exceptional book of 2015 by the Children’s Book Council, was shortlisted for the Reading the West Book Award, and was included on the Kansas State Reading Circle List. It was adapted for the stage and performed by Sacramento’s Now Here This and is being adapted for the screen by Jeff Arch, the screenwriter best known for writing Sleepless in Seattle. Her second novel, The Long Ride Home, was released by Sourcebooks Fire in September 2017. She is the author of two poetry collections: Siren Song (Burlesque Press) and So Speak the Stars (Texture Press). Her work was anthologized in Best Travel Writing 2010, The Soul of a Great Traveler, and Monday Nights, and has been published in myriad journals and magazines. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of New Orleans and teaches creative writing at various universities and writers retreats throughout the U.S., Europe, and Mexico.

WEEKEND SCHEDULE

Friday Check-In 12-4 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
Friday Supper and Welcome 5:00 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
First Workshop 7:00-9:00 pm Please Check Course Packet
Saturday
 Breakfast 7:00-9:30 am  Gracemere Hall Great Room 
 Morning Workshop 10:00am-12:30pm  Please Check Course Packet 
Lunch   1:00-2:30 pm

Cardinall Hall

 Workshops  3:00-6:00 pm Please Check Course Packet 
 Dinner   6:30-7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room    
Evening Reading (open mic) 7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
Sunday
Breakfast 7:00-9:00 am Gracemere Hall Great Room
Workshops 9:30-11:30 am Please Check Course Packet
Farewell Lunch 12:00 Gracemere Hall Great Room

WEEKLONG RETREAT

Check-in-Sunday

4:00-6:00 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room

Sunday Supper and Welcome 6:00 Gracemere Hall Great Room
First Workshop 8:00-9:00 pm

TBA

The Daily Schedule

Breakfast  7:00-10:00 am  Gracemere Hall Great Room  
FREE TIME 10:00 -12:00 pm  
Writer’s and Readers Series 12:00-1:00 pm Kistler Library Info Commons
Lunch  1:00-2:00 pm Cardinal Hall Cafeteria
Workshops 2:00-5:00 TBA
Dinner   On your own

Special Events

Monday Night Faculty Reading 7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room
Tuesday Night Informal Publishing Roundtable 7:30 pm Gracemere Hall Great Room

Wednesday Night Guest and

Alumni Reading                    

7:30 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room  

Thursday Night Student Open Mic

7:30 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room

Friday Night Farewell Supper           

6:00 pm

Gracemere Hall Great Room

Checkout-Saturday

 10:00 am  
 

  

 

 

 

Questions?

Contact MFA Program Director,
Carla Spataro
cspataro@rosemont.edu or 610-527-0200 ext. 2346