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Degree Options and Requirements

 
Two women are seen in a counseling office. One has straight blonde hair and wears black, professional-looking clothes. She appears to be the therapist. She is speaking with a client and the back of her head is visible. She has long  brown hair. Rosemont's 60-credit MA in Counseling program earns a Master's Degree and satisfies Licensure education requirements. You may choose to concentrate in either Clinical Mental Health Counseling or in School Counseling. The degree requirements for each of the Counseling Programs are listed below.
 
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Courses are offered at our Rosemont College Campus in Bryn Mawr, PA as well as our satellite campus at Cedar Crest College in Allentown, PA. Both the School Counseling and Clinical Mental Health Counseling concentrations satisfy requirements for professional licensure in the state of Pennsylvania and national certification as a counselor (NCC), pending a successful passing score on the National Counselors Examination (NCE). 

A full list of courses required in the School Counselor concentration is included here. Class syllabi are included in the dropdown menus of course descriptions.

MA in Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Counseling (60 Credits)

Offered at Cedar Crest and Rosemont Main Campus

Students have the opportunity to earn a sub-concentration in trauma counseling or in forensics counseling by selecting certain electives. The trauma counseling sub-concentration includes coursework in Mindfulness and Meditation and Strategies in Treating Grief and Bereavement. The forensic counseling sub-concentration includes coursework in Victimology and Offender Treatment. Students are not required to choose either sub-concentration and may select any of the courses below.

Level I Courses - 15 Credits

Each Course is 3 Credits

These required courses serve as the foundation of the graduate counseling program.

The course provides an overview of the field of counseling with emphasis on understanding the nature and stages of counseling as well as the counselor's role in individual and group work. Major counseling theories and the techniques associated with the theoretical approaches are presented. Awareness of professional organizations and scholarly work is highlighted.

This course examines how to establish, facilitate, and terminate various counseling groups in an effective manner. Group counseling theories and specialized techniques for enhancing interpersonal communication skills are presented Students will actively participate in group sessions to better comprehend group dynamics, stages of the group development, and the role of the facilitator in group counseling sessions.

Download Syllabus

This course focuses on the development of counseling skills through instruction and experiential exercises including videotaped practice sessions.

Techniques and skills including developing a treatment alliance, active listening, reflection, formulation of questions, and addressing issues of resistance to treatment and personal biases will be examined.

Download Syllabus

This course explores professional practice issues in clinical mental health counseling. It examines the history of the profession, professional counseling identity, roles, and functions of clinical mental health counselors, ethical, and legal considerations of the profession, multicultural competencies, and modern trends impacting the field and practice of mental health counseling.

Download Syllabus

This course explores a discussion of legal and ethical issues in professional practice. This in-depth study of legal and ethical topics is guided by state and federal laws as well as the code of ethics of national organizations in counseling, such as the American Counseling Association (ACA) and American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA). Current legal and professional thought is explored by drawing on court cases and clinical dilemmas.

Download Syllabus

Level II Counseling Courses (30 Credits)

You may enroll in these required courses after the completion of all Level I Courses or in conjunction with Level I Courses. 

This course is an advanced theoretical examination of physical, cognitive, social, moral, and personal development during infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The process and stages of development throughout the lifespan form the context for the study of human behavior. Theories and models of human development will be reviewed from a historical and modern-day perspective.

Download Syllabus

This course reviews counseling theory and approach as it pertains to the treatment and intervention with various multicultural populations, included but not limited to race, ethnicity, age, disability, and gender.

Reading and discussion with emphasize current research concerning learning personality, attitudes, perceptions, abilities, and adjustment of multicultural populations in a variety of counseling contexts. Examination of self and other awareness will be highlighted.

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This course examines the theory, administration, interpretation, and reporting of tests and assessments. Students will become familiar with the administration of various assessments for diagnostic purposes and career counseling.

Students will review information on the intake process, appropriate selection of assessment with considerations towards cultural sensitivity, behavioral observation techniques, and the integration of test data for report writing.

Download Syllabus

This course examines theories of career choice and cultural and social influences on the world of work across the lifespan. Students will review career decision-making, problem-solving strategies, gender stereotyping, occupational information resources, academic preparation, and lifework planning. Vocation counseling sessions will be practiced for study and analysis during class.

Download Syllabus

 This course is an investigation of descriptive, relational, and experimental approaches to research, with a focus on statistics and design issues, including control strategies and procedures for establishing validity.

Special emphasis will be placed on how to design and conduct a research project, including the collection, analysis , and interpretation of data. Students will read, interpret, and critically evaluate qualitative and quantitative studies within the counseling literature.

Download Syllabus

This course emphasizes the formal diagnosis of mental disorders using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as well as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). This course will use case studies to explore the identification of symptoms and symptom clusters, with examination of etiology, co-morbidity, and treatment options for different disorders, as well as understanding the usefulness and limits of formal diagnosis.

Other topics will include intake information gathering, mental status evaluation, and assessment of specific clinical challenges. The course will also review possible treatment modalities along with ethical and multicultural issues.

Download Syllabus

 This course presents as an introduction to family counseling and therapy. Class sessions will address both conceptual and practical skills in working with families, specifically families with children and/or adolescents.

The course is designed to provide a foundation for conceptualizing the dynamics of familial relationships. Couples counseling and marital therapy will be reviewed.

Download Syllabus

This course examines the classification of drugs as well as the physiological and psychological effects of drug use and drug abuse. Personal, social, and biological frames of reference will be used as a basis for understanding the causes of addiction and its impact on the individual, family, and society.

Prevention and intervention counseling models and strategies will be reviewed as well as common methods of assessing substance use disorders.

Download Syllabus

This course is an in-depth examination of current theory and research on the development assessment, and treatment of psychological trauma. Attention will be given to the identification of risk and protective factors in the development of trauma responses for individuals with various mental health needs across the lifespan.

Evidence-based assessment and treatment techniques are reviewed, Mudding utilization of 09/1 criteria and early warning signs and symptoms.

Download Syllabus

This course focuses on the theories and methods used in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Emphasis will be placed on core beliefs, automatic thoughts, the structure of a therapeutic sessions and techniques and strategies related to counseling skills.

Through case studies and skills practice, students will become proficient in implementing practical counseling skills related to the Cognitive Behavioral approach.

Download Syllabus

Level II Electives (6 Credits)

Each Course is 3 Credits

You may enroll in these elective courses after the completion of all Level I Courses or in conjunction with Level II Courses. Only two of the listed electives are required to fulfill requirements for the MA in Counseling program. 

This course reviews evidenced-based practices in mindfulness and meditation. Students will learn how effective mindfulness and meditation practices can support healthy functioning in specific demographics for counseling prevention, intervention, and postvention. Mindfulness and meditation practices will be highlighted in relation to counselor self-care as well professional counselor identity development.

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This course focuses on the different types, stages, and symptoms of grief, bereavement, and loss. Students will review high-risk behaviors for prolonged grief/bereavement, learn coping strategies, and understand best practices in counseling. Pathology in relation to grief, bereavement, and loss will be explored as well as grief and loss through the lens of divorce, disability, and infertility.

Community resources and support systems for grief and loss will be emphasized from a cultural perspective and students will assess their own self-awareness towards their experience of grief and loss.

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This course introduces students to central questions and research in the field of victimology. Emphasis is placed on the role of victims in the criminal process, problems of adjustment to victimization, offender relationships, victim compensation, restorative justice, and victim's rights.

Several victim typologies also will be addressed. Students will be given the tools necessary for critical evaluation and understanding of the often-neglected role of the victim before, during and after the criminal event.

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This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of counseling techniques and the relationships with adult offenders in our society. Major topics to be covered include mental health issues common with adult offenders, assessment and diagnosis of adult offenders, role of counselors working with adult offenders, and current treatment approaches. The role of political ideology and social context in generating and supporting different correctional strategies will be reviewed.

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The course is designed to prepare students to effectively provide academic, behavioral, and emotional guidance to the exceptional learner in individual and group counseling settings.

A historical overview of special education, including legislation and litigation issues will be explored as well as an examination of current practices in the field of special education.

Student will review evidenced-based strategies for exceptional learners and competencies to be culturally sensitive to the identified populations.

Download Syllabus

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the specific academic, behavioral, and emotional challenges a student may experience in acquiring English as a Second Language.

Areas of emphasis will focus on counseling strategies, interventions and techniques most appropriate for guiding and supporting the ESL population. Academic readiness, closing the achievement gap and culturally sensitive and diverse strategies are covered.

Download Syllabus

Level III Courses (9 Credits)

Students must complete the above marked courses prior to enrolling in Clinical Mental Health Practicum.

This course functions to support the development and application of knowledge and skills for clinical mental health counselors through practical experience at hospitals, private practices, community mental health facilities, and other clinical settings.

The course requires the accrual of 50 direct service hours and 50 indirect service hours (100 total hours) in addition to the review of recorded counseling sessions to assess skills and techniques.

Download Syllabus

This course functions to support the development and application of knowledge and skills for clinical mental health counselors through practical experience at hospitals, private practices, community mental health facilities, and other clinical settings.

The course requires the accrual of 120 direct service hours, 120 indirect service hours, and 60 instructional hours (300 total hours) in addition to the review of recorded counseling sessions to assess skills and techniques.

Download Syllabus

This course functions to support the development and application of knowledge and skills for clinical mental health counselors through practical experience at hospitals, private practices, community mental health facilities, and other clinical settings.

The course requires the accrual of 120 direct service hours, 120 indirect service hours, and 60 instructional hours (300 total hours) in addition to the review of recorded counseling sessions to assess skills and techniques.

Download Syllabus


MA in Counseling, School Counseling - 60 Credits

School Counseling Courses are offered at Rosemont Main Campus Only

Level I Courses - 15-credits

Each Course is 3 credits. These required courses serve as the foundation for the program.

The course provides an overview of the field of counseling with emphasis on understanding the nature and stages of counseling as well as the counselor's role in individual and group work. Major counseling theories and the techniques associated with the theoretical approaches are presented. Awareness of professional organizations and scholarly work is highlighted.

This course examines how to establish, facilitate, and terminate various counseling groups in an effective manner. Group counseling theories and specialized techniques for enhancing interpersonal communication skills are presented. Students will actively participate in group sessions to better comprehend group dynamics, stages of the group development, and the role of the facilitator in group counseling sessions.

Download Syllabus

This course focuses on the theories and methods used in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Emphasis will be placed on core beliefs, automatic thoughts, the structure of  therapeutic sessions and techniques and strategies related to counseling skills.

Through case studies and skills practice, students will become proficient in implementing practical counseling skills related to the Cognitive Behavioral approach.

Download Syllabus

This course focuses on the development of counseling skills through instruction and experiential exercises including videotaped practice sessions. Techniques and skills including developing a treatment alliance, active listening, reflection, formulation of questions, and addressing issues of resistance to treatment and personal biases will be examined.

Download Syllabus

The course provides students with an understanding of the various roles of school counselors to promote a strong professional identity in alignment with the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model. Topics for review will highlight an approach to connect school counselor competencies for building and implementing a comprehensive school counseling program.

Current issues in school counseling will be examined through national publications, scholarly research, and the professional experiences of school counseling within the field of practice.

Download Syllabus

This course is designed to provide prospective school counselors with information about contemporary professional issues in school counseling. This course is designed to examine current professional issues in school counseling, the transformed role of the school counselor, and components of successful comprehensive school counseling programs.

In addition, essential theories, research and practice of the profession will be investigated. Emphasis is placed on developing the awareness, knowledge and skills necessary to effectively negotiate the cultural, educational, social and philosophical forces that impact the lives and academic achievement of students in a pluralistic society.

Download Syllabus

Level II Courses (36-credits)

Each course is 3 credits.

Students may enroll in these required courses after the completion of all Level I Courses or in conjunction with Level I Courses. 

This course is an advanced theoretical examination of physical, cognitive, social, moral, and personal development during infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.

The process and stages of development throughout the lifespan form the context for the study of human behavior. Theories and models of human development will be reviewed from a historical and modern-day perspective.

Download Syllabus

This course examines the theory, administration, interpretation, and reporting of tests and assessments. Students will become familiar with the administration of various assessments for diagnostic purposes and career counseling.

Students will review information on the intake process, appropriate selection of assessment with considerations towards cultural sensitivity, behavioral observation techniques, and the integration of test data for report writing.

Download Syllabus

This course examines theories of career choice and cultural and social influences on the world of work across the lifespan. Students will review career decision-making, problem-solving strategies, gender stereotyping, occupational information resources, academic preparation, and lifework planning. Vocation counseling sessions will be practiced for study and analysis during class.

Download Syllabus

This course is an investigation of descriptive, relational, and experimental approaches to research, with a focus on statistics and design issues, including control strategies and procedures for establishing validity.

Special emphasis will be placed on how to design and conduct a research project, including the collection, analysis , and interpretation of data. Students will read, interpret, and critically evaluate qualitative and quantitative studies within the counseling literature.

Download Syllabus

The course is designed to prepare students to effectively provide academic, behavioral, and emotional guidance to the exceptional learner in individual and group counseling settings.

A historical overview of special education, including legislation and litigation issues will be explored as well as an examination of current practices in the field of special education.

Student will review evidenced-based strategies for exceptional learners and competencies to be culturally sensitive to the identified populations.

Download Syllabus

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the specific academic, behavioral, and emotional challenges a student may experience in acquiring English as a Second Language.

Areas of emphasis will focus on counseling strategies, interventions and techniques most appropriate for guiding and supporting the ESL population. Academic readiness, closing the achievement gap and culturally sensitive and diverse strategies are covered.

Download Syllabus

This course is an in-depth examination of current theory and research on the development, assessment, and treatment of psychological trauma. Attention will be given to the identification of risk and protective factor in the development of trauma responses for individuals with various mental health needs across the lifespan. Evidence-based assessment and treatment techniques are reviewed, including utilization of DSM criteria and early warning signs and symptoms.

Download Syllabus

 This course presents as an introduction to family counseling and therapy. Class sessions will address both conceptual and practical skills in working with families, specifically families with children and/or adolescents.

The course is designed to provide a foundation for conceptualizing the dynamics of familial relationships. Couples counseling and marital therapy will be  reviewed.

Download Syllabus

This course explores professional practice issues in clinical mental health counseling. It examines the history of the profession, professional counseling identity, roles, and functions of clinical mental health counselors, ethical, and legal considerations of the profession, multicultural competencies, and modern trends impacting the field and practice of mental health counseling.

Download Syllabus

This course emphasizes the formal diagnosis of mental disorders using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as well as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). This course will use case studies to explore the identification of symptoms and symptom clusters, with examination of etiology, co-morbidity, and treatment options for different disorders, as well as understanding the usefulness and limits of formal diagnosis.

Other topics will include intake information gathering, mental status evaluation, and assessment of specific clinical challenges. The course will also review possible treatment modalities along with ethical and multicultural issues.

Download Syllabus

This course examines the classification of drugs as well as the physiological and psychological effects of drug use and drug abuse. Personal, social, and biological frames of reference will be used as a basis for understanding the causes of addiction and its impact on the individual, family, and society.

Prevention and intervention counseling models and strategies will be reviewed as well as common methods of assessing substance use disorders.

Download Syllabus

Level III Courses (9-credits)

Each Course is 3 Credits

Students must complete the above marked courses prior to enrolling in Clinical Mental Health Practicum. 

This course functions to support the development and application of knowledge and skills for school counselors through practical experience at an elementary, middle, or high school setting. The course requires the accrual of 50 direct service hours and 50 indirect service hours (100 total hours) in addition to the review of recorded counseling sessions to assess skills and techniques.

Download Syllabus

This course functions to support the development and application of knowledge and skills for school counselors through practical experience at an elementary, middle, or high school setting. The course requires the accrual of 120 direct service hours, 120 indirect service hours, and 30 instructional hours (300 total hours) in addition to the review of recorded counseling sessions to assess skills and techniques.

Download Syllabus

This course functions to support the development and application of knowledge and skills for school counselors through practical experience at an elementary, middle, or high school setting. The course requires the accrual of 120 direct service hours, 120 indirect service hours, and 60 instructional hours (300 total hours) in addition to the review of recorded counseling sessions to assess skills and techniques.

Download Syllabus