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Rosemont Writer’s Studio

campisThe mission of the Rosemont Writer’s Studio is to offer MFA graduates, from any program, and other members of the larger Philadelphia writing community an opportunity to take focused writing workshops at a reasonable cost.

*The WritersStudio courses are non-credit offerings of Rosemont College’s MFA Program.

The Writer’s Studio will offer six-week courses that meet once a week for two hours, either on a weeknight or on Saturday. Courses are either open to all levels of student, from beginner to advanced, or restricted to advanced students only. To gain entry to an advanced class students must have graduated from an MFA program, or have special permission from the MFA program director. 

*All courses are capped at 12 students. They require a minimum of 3 students to run.

Courses are held at either the Rosemont Main Campus (1400 Montgomery Ave, Rosemont, PA) or at our Center City location (in the Land Title Building, 100 S. Broad Street, 16th Floor). Discounted parking at the Center City location is available at the Holiday Inn Parking Lot at 13th and Walnut. 

 

Fall 1: September 11-October 21, 2017 

Fall 2: October 30-December 9, 2017 

Winter: February 5-March 17, 2018 

Spring: April 16-May 26, 2018 

Mondays 6-8 PM Main Campus

Novel Manuscript Preparation (Fiction)

Advanced Students Only (MFA grads or permission of the program director)

Tawni Waters

Your manuscript is finished. Now what? This workshop will help you prepare your book for submission to agents and editors and teach you how to write an effective query letter, pitch, and synopsis.

 

Tuesday 6-8 PM Main Campus

Flash CNF, Write Toward Brevity (CNF)

All Levels

Kristina Moriconi

Flash back. Flash forward. Zoom in and out on the present moment. Find the perfect way to capture your personal stories in their most concise and compressed prose form. In this creative nonfiction workshop, we will work together to refine our language, to distill it down to a kind of brevity that will leave your reader both satisfied and wanting more.

 

Thursdays 6-8 PM Main Campus

The Write Bait (Poetry)

Advanced Students Only (MFA grads or permission of the program director)

Grant Clauser

Poetry that grabs the reader right away and keeps them hanging on is poetry that knows how to bait the hook. There are many lures you can use to hook a reader. Flashy imagery, fresh metaphors, sharp word choice and compelling narratives are just a few. In this workshop we'll examine effective bait, learn how to set the hook and how not the lose the reader just as you get them to the side of the boat. Examples, in-class exercise and take-home prompts will all be part of the process. We'll send the writer home with a full tackle box to use in their own practice.

 

Saturdays 10 AM-12PM Main Campus

Writer’s Boot Camp (Fiction)

All Levels

Gregory Frost

A class covering basics of writing fiction, beginning with grammar and punctuation and formatting as they apply in fiction, and continuing with the basics of creating multi-dimensional characters; narrative strategies in short fiction versus novels; expanding out from sentences to paragraphs to scenes to chapters, etc.

Mondays 6-8 PM Main Campus

First 50 Pages Workshop (Fiction)

Advanced Students Only (MFA grads or permission of the program director)

Tawni Waters

The first fifty pages of your novel will make the difference between finding an agent or editor and not. This workshop will help you hone and polish your manuscript in order to help you show your work to its best advantage.

 

Tuesdays 6-8 PM Main Campus

Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Advanced Students Only (MFA grads or permission of the program director)

Erin Entrada Kelly

Agents and editors expect publishable manuscripts when they search through their query piles. It’s not enough to have a robust story line and well-placed commas. In this highly competitive industry, every page must serve a purpose, from sentence to scene. Unfortunately, it can be incredibly difficult for writers to approach their work objectively, and professional editors are often costly and out of reach.

This course will teach you how to divorce yourself from your work so you can revise and edit efficiently and effectively. You will learn tips of the editing trade, what it means to have a “publishable manuscript,” and practical ways to tackle your work. The course will focus on the craft of editing, with an instructor-led workshop. Students should bring work that’s ready for editing.

 

Thursdays 6-8 PM Center City Campus

The Craft of Voice (Fiction/CNF)

All Levels

Emma Eisenberg

We know it when we hear it: that distinctive voice on the page that grabs us by the shirt collar and says, "Come closer, listen to this." Many of our finest writers believe that a successful voice is the engine of any great book, not its plot. But how do we craft it ourselves on the page? This is a workshop for nonfiction and fiction writers: perhaps you are struggling to hone your storytelling persona and make it stand out from the riff raff, or perhaps you are trying to conjure the speech and flavor of a particular character, moment, or location. We'll read some of the best voices in modern fiction and nonfiction, parse what makes them hum, do hands-on exercises that will have you writing in voices outside your comfort zone, and workshop the results. Revisions or excerpts of longer projects also welcome.

 

Saturdays 10 AM-12 PM Main Campus

The Hitchhiking Writer’s Guide to Inspiration (Poetry)

All Levels

Vernita Hall

Where do you find sources of ideas for your writing? This class will challenge you to hitch a ride on the wagon of Inspiration. Get pricked by needles in haystacks. Dig deep. Root out new meanings from old words. Think and explore outside the box. (There is no box.) Piggyback news articles, scientific discoveries, history, and the natural world to generate new connections. Explore those linkages in imaginative language, using more than just your five senses. Fueled by the power of suggestion, travel from portmanteaux to subtext, past the black holes of erasure, through the realms of the concrete and the surreal. Transform into a new person in persona. Come on. Put that thumb out. Hitch your pencil to a star. Climb aboard.

 

Mondays 6-8 PM Main Campus

Pruning the Burning Bush (CNF)

All Levels

Vernita Hall

How might you enhance the wordiness of your prose with the dense compactness of the poet? Like a skilled gardener—pruning and fertilizing. This class will explore the artful use of craft in creative nonfiction writing, and dare you to sharpen your pruning shears. Load up your writer’s wheelbarrow with metaphor and imagery. Dig deeper. Mine down into the marrow of your word choices for maximum language effectiveness. Be prepared to carve up your sacred cows. Sculpt your prose to shout out with a booming voice—or a whisper. Don’t be afraid to make your poetic prose voice heard. Get rid of the dead wood. Strike a match. Light a fire.

 

Tuesdays 6-8 PM Center City Campus

Character in Fiction (Fiction)

All Levels

Merry Jones

How do you create compelling characters? (i.e. Protagonists that are complex and appealing, antagonists that are disturbing yet human, and a whole gang who are multi-dimensional enough to seem real.) This course will look at techniques for revealing and building character, including dialog, motivation, contradictions, descriptions, action, backstory and more. In the process, it will touch other elements, such as plot development and setting, but with the understanding that, no matter what the genre, a good book relies on its characters.

 

Wednesdays 6-8 PM Center City Campus

Speculative Fiction (Fiction)

Advanced Students Only (MFA grads or permission of the program director)

Blythe Davenport

Join an experienced writing mentor for a writing workshop that will focus on speculative fiction short stories, novellas or novels. Speculative fiction encompasses many smaller genres, from magical realism to steampunk to space western sci-fi; we will be prepared to read literary fiction as well as more genre-focused work.

 

Thursdays 6-8 PM

Writing Poetry from Nostalgia (Poetry)

Advanced Students Only (MFA grads or permission of the program director)

Grant Clauser

The most fertile ground for finding writing material is in our own past. Our memories and how we feel/reflect on them often produces the best poems, as well as the best insights for the present. We'll look to your home, your childhood, and your past friends to discover triggers for new poems. We'll also discuss when it's right to exaggerate or even lie, especially when writing about your life. This workshop will help writers find ideas and offer strategies for developing them into engaging works.

Mondays 6-8 PM Main Campus

Whose Story is it Anyway? (Fiction)

All Levels

Casey Krivy Hirsch

Have you ever drafted a short story or a novel, gotten well into it, perhaps completed a draft, and realized the character telling the story isn’t quite up to the job? Perhaps one character you created has snatched the POV from the narrator you intended. Maybe more than one character needs to have a narrative voice.

There are many variations on narrative point-of-view and, through sharing and discussing your work with your peers in the Writer’s Studio, we’ll discuss both the positive outcomes of the “wrong” narrator, and choices you can make about the narrator best suited to your work – even if there must ultimately be more than one narrator for the job.

 

Tuesdays 6-8 PM Main Campus

Constructing the Hybrid (Poetry/CNF/Fiction)

All Levels

Kristina Moriconi

Rules are meant to be broken sometimes. Lines meant to be blurred. And, while we’re at it, genres might as well be crossed here and there. That is the freedom the hybrid form gives us. It is unpredictable. It resists form. It goes by any number of names: the prose poem, lyric essay, nonlinear narrative, montage, collage, mosaic… In this class, we will explore these possibilities. We will fragment and thread, segment and braid. We will mix poetry and prose, fact and fiction, memoir and history, to construct our own hybrid pieces, discovering together the unexpected places of overlap and intersection.

 

Wednesdays 6-8 PM Center City Campus

Poetry Workshop (Poetry)

Advanced Students Only (MFA grads or permission of the program director)

Blythe Davenport

Join an experienced writing mentor for a writing workshop that will focus on literary poetry. Participants should be experienced writers writing at publication level. This course is ideal for writers who have a serious interest in critiquing and writing poetry, who are not afraid to experiment with structure, and who want to develop pieces for publication or a manuscript.

 

Thursdays 6-8 PM Main Campus

Writing Creative Nonfiction & Memoir (CNF)

All Levels

Richard Bank

This course will explore the craft of writing Creative Nonfiction and its sub-genres including memoir, personal and literary essays, opinion pieces, reviews, travel articles, and narrative nonfiction. The course will include an overview examining the components of creative nonfiction writing; samples will be read and discussed; ethical issues unique to the genre regarding how far one can stray from fact and the use of literary license; research techniques; and written exercises designed to develop specific skills needed to write effectively in the genre. Relevant legal issues such as libel and privacy will be reviewed. Students will submit work within the genre that may be short complete pieces or a portion of a larger even book length project which will be workshopped by the class. Potential markets for creative nonfiction will be suggested.

 

$450  general

$375 for Rosemont students and alumni 

 

Contact MFA Program Director, Carla Spataro 

(610)527-0200 ext. 2346 

cspataro@rosemont.edu